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Oxygen and Anti-Aging

The body’s ability to transfer oxygen to the cells becomes damaged as we age. When oxygen pressure falls, there is not enough pressure to push the volume to a usable state inside the cells. This transfer of oxygen from the blood to the cells is perhaps the most significant underlying factor in whether we live a healthy life or not. The more damaged the transfer mechanism becomes; the more likely we will become ill. This is why we are more susceptible to illness as we age.

Time Magazine wrote, “What makes cells age? Wear and tear, yes. But biologically, says, Dr. David Sinclair, professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, its lack of oxygen that signals cells that it is their time to go. Without oxygen, the energy engines known as the mitochondria become less efficient at turning physiological fuel like glucose into the energy that the cells need to function. Eventually, they shut down.”

Mark Twain said, "Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of 80 and gradually approach 18." Nobody enjoys the little signs of aging we see when looking in the mirror each morning. People spend billions of dollars a year on products and surgeries to help look and feel younger: hair re-growth products, dyes to hide the grey, anti-wrinkle face and eye creams, cosmetic injections, surgeries and more.

Live Oxygen therapy actually raises the arterial oxygen pressure back to youthful levels brining levels of oxygen into the cells that have the power, not just to prevent aging, but also to push back on time. We can push back against death if we are at death’s door and we can regress our vascular age and thus actually get younger if we persist with our oxygen training.

Flooding the body with oxygen will have excellent results for eye problems  as we age including cataracts (this is understandable, since the lens of the eye is known to be oxygen-deficient already). Other illnesses that benefit from Oxygen Therapy include senility, joint disturbances, liver and internal organ disturbances, infections, radiation exposure, late effects of strokes, poisonings, burns, and stress.